Cockatoo on a Red Maple Branch, Gantai (1782–1865)
Period:Edo period (1615–1868)
Date:mid- 19th century
Culture:Japan
Medium:Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk
Dimensions:Image: 41 1/8 × 14 13/16 in. (104.5 × 37.7 cm) Overall with mounting: 74 3/16 × 19 5/16 in. (188.5 × 49 cm)

Cockatoo on a Red Maple Branch, Gantai (1782–1865)

Period:Edo period (1615–1868)

Date:mid- 19th century

Culture:Japan

Medium:Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk

Dimensions:Image: 41 1/8 × 14 13/16 in. (104.5 × 37.7 cm) Overall with mounting: 74 3/16 × 19 5/16 in. (188.5 × 49 cm)

artofthedarkages:

“Relief of the Liberation of a Besieged City”
A wooden relief (perhaps a wall decoration) of the driving-off of barbarian invaders from an abstracted fortified city by a Christian army. The enlarged figures at the top of the walls are probably protective saints, while the figures held against the bottom of the walls are probably executed enemies. 
Carved out of dark wood.
Made in the fifth century at El Ashmunein in Byzantine Egypt. In the tradition of Roman battle reliefs. Currently held at the Bode Museum in Berlin.

artofthedarkages:

Relief of the Liberation of a Besieged City

A wooden relief (perhaps a wall decoration) of the driving-off of barbarian invaders from an abstracted fortified city by a Christian army. The enlarged figures at the top of the walls are probably protective saints, while the figures held against the bottom of the walls are probably executed enemies. 

Carved out of dark wood.

Made in the fifth century at El Ashmunein in Byzantine Egypt. In the tradition of Roman battle reliefs. Currently held at the Bode Museum in Berlin.

archaicwonder:

Scythian Gold and Turquoise Zoomorphic Handle, Southern Urals, c. 4th century BC
Scythian art combined Eastern elements with influences from the Hellenic states on the northern coast of the Black Sea. The principal feature of Scythian art is its use of a zoomorphic symbology.
The handle is formed of sheet gold, in two halves, hammered over a wooden mold and chased, in the form of a predator, perhaps a wolf, standing four-square, its head down, baring fangs, with clawed feet, the fur rendered as incised spirals, beading fringing the ears, with drop-shaped turquoise inlays on the shoulders and haunches, the interior of the ears also inlaid in turquoise, the bottoms of the feet and mouth once conforming to the curvature of a vessel wall, originally set vertically.
More about Scythian art

archaicwonder:

Scythian Gold and Turquoise Zoomorphic Handle, Southern Urals, c. 4th century BC

Scythian art combined Eastern elements with influences from the Hellenic states on the northern coast of the Black Sea. The principal feature of Scythian art is its use of a zoomorphic symbology.

The handle is formed of sheet gold, in two halves, hammered over a wooden mold and chased, in the form of a predator, perhaps a wolf, standing four-square, its head down, baring fangs, with clawed feet, the fur rendered as incised spirals, beading fringing the ears, with drop-shaped turquoise inlays on the shoulders and haunches, the interior of the ears also inlaid in turquoise, the bottoms of the feet and mouth once conforming to the curvature of a vessel wall, originally set vertically.

More about Scythian art

archaicwonder:

A Hellenistic Herakles knot pendant, Circa 4th-3rd Century BC



Composed of two sheet gold tubes decorated with scrolls of applied beaded wire, the hollow repoussé lion head terminals with gaping jaws holding gold hoops, with a die-struck gold draped dancing Maenad holding a staff applied to the centre, on the underside two now-flattened short tubes for attachment.
The Herakles knot is a recurrent motif in Hellenistic jewellery, in particular as a centerpiece for necklaces and diadems. As a fertility symbol, it is often associated with blood-red garnets or figures of Eros and dancing Maenads, as demonstrated by this example.

archaicwonder:

A Hellenistic Herakles knot pendant, Circa 4th-3rd Century BC


Composed of two sheet gold tubes decorated with scrolls of applied beaded wire, the hollow repoussé lion head terminals with gaping jaws holding gold hoops, with a die-struck gold draped dancing Maenad holding a staff applied to the centre, on the underside two now-flattened short tubes for attachment.

The Herakles knot is a recurrent motif in Hellenistic jewellery, in particular as a centerpiece for necklaces and diadems. As a fertility symbol, it is often associated with blood-red garnets or figures of Eros and dancing Maenads, as demonstrated by this example.