artemisdreaming:

 
Japan, Nô Costume (Awase kariginu, Sashinuki and Koshi obi), a-b: late Edo/early Meiji period, 19th century; c-d: Late Meiji period, late 19th century or early 20th century
Art Institute of Chicago
a: silk, complex gauze weave self-patterned by areas of plain interlacing with silk tapes of 3:1 twill oblique interlacing, ikat; lined; plain weave; b: silk, weft-ribbed plain weave; waist band and ties: silk, plain weave; cords: silk, four element square braid, three element ply; c: silk, warp-faced, weft-ribbed plain weave; warp ikat; embroidered in satin, stem and straight stitches; couching; four element square braid fringe; d: plain weave. a: 96.5 x 148.6 cm (38 x 58 1/2 in.)  a repeat: 23 x 15.5 cm (9 1/8 x 6 1/2 in.) b: 165.1 x 59.3 cm (65 x 23 3/8 in.)  c: 65 x 9.2 cm (25 1/2 x 3 5/8 in.)  d: 240 x 8 cm (94 5/8 x 3 1/8 in.)Oriental Department Sundry Trust Fund, 1940.1102a-d

artemisdreaming:

 

Japan, Nô Costume (Awase kariginu, Sashinuki and Koshi obi), a-b: late Edo/early Meiji period, 19th century; c-d: Late Meiji period, late 19th century or early 20th century

Art Institute of Chicago

a: silk, complex gauze weave self-patterned by areas of plain interlacing with silk tapes of 3:1 twill oblique interlacing, ikat; lined; plain weave; b: silk, weft-ribbed plain weave; waist band and ties: silk, plain weave; cords: silk, four element square braid, three element ply; c: silk, warp-faced, weft-ribbed plain weave; warp ikat; embroidered in satin, stem and straight stitches; couching; four element square braid fringe; d: plain weave. a: 96.5 x 148.6 cm (38 x 58 1/2 in.)  a repeat: 23 x 15.5 cm (9 1/8 x 6 1/2 in.) b: 165.1 x 59.3 cm (65 x 23 3/8 in.)  c: 65 x 9.2 cm (25 1/2 x 3 5/8 in.)  d: 240 x 8 cm (94 5/8 x 3 1/8 in.)
Oriental Department Sundry Trust Fund, 1940.1102a-d

epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info
epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga
Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.
Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”
From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”
Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine
Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook
Zoom Info

epruitt:

Artist Ronit Baranga

Israeili Artist Ronit Baranga, b. 1973, uses clay and porcelain to craft her sculptures.  Baranga’s process mainly involves using different kinds of clays such as liquid and solid clays for sculpting.

Baranga’s work is on the border between concrete and unreal life.  This border allows her to express complex emotional feelings by creating anthropomorphic images- human and inanimate objects- combined as one (cups on fingers; masks with human mouths; hollowed, headless figures wearing masks; tea drinking ceremony using empty cups).  “I believe that this combination in my art makes people feel. Viewers of my work react almost instantly- they are either enthusiastic or appalled, but never indifferent. I hope their reaction also stimulates them to think about the ideas behind my work.”

From the Artist, "the use of fingers and mouths in my work is full of intent and meaning. The fingers and the mouth are very sensual organs in the human body and are therefore very powerful as separated items from it. The “seamless” combination of these organs in plates or cups, appearing as one, creates, in my opinion, new items that “feel” their environment and respond to it.”

Sources: Ronit Baranga | High Fructose | Bored Panda | Yatzer | Empty Kingdom | Rooms Magazine

Also Check out Ronit Baranga’s other website: Facebook


gżegżółka | a polish mix to make you fall in love with the language so full of traps you will break your tongue time and time again

niebo do wynajęcia robert kasprzycki | trudno mi się przyznać ania | długość dźwięku samotności myslovitz | a my nie chcemy uciekać stąd jacek wójcicki | piękna i rycerz anita lipnicka | wrony piotr rogucki | lu, li, la zakopower | upojenie anna maria jopek & michał żebrowski | bracka grzegorz turnau | ostatni edyta bartosiewicz | śmierć na pięć republika | kantana marek grechuta

gżegżółka | a polish mix to make you fall in love with the language so full of traps you will break your tongue time and time again

niebo do wynajęcia robert kasprzycki | trudno mi się przyznać ania | długość dźwięku samotności myslovitz | a my nie chcemy uciekać stąd jacek wójcicki | piękna i rycerz anita lipnicka | wrony piotr rogucki | lu, li, la zakopower | upojenie anna maria jopek & michał żebrowski | bracka grzegorz turnau | ostatni edyta bartosiewicz | śmierć na pięć republika | kantana marek grechuta

artemisdreaming:

Chôken (Nô Costume), 1901/25, Meiji period (1868-1912)/ Taishô period (1912-1926)
Silk and gold-leaf-over-lacquered-paper strips, complex gauze weave with supplementary brocading wefts 125.4 x 207 cm (49 x 81 1/2 in.)Art Institute of Chicago gift of Mrs. J. L. Valentine, 1928.812

artemisdreaming:

Chôken (Nô Costume), 1901/25, Meiji period (1868-1912)/ Taishô period (1912-1926)

Silk and gold-leaf-over-lacquered-paper strips, complex gauze weave with supplementary brocading wefts
125.4 x 207 cm (49 x 81 1/2 in.)
Art Institute of Chicago gift of Mrs. J. L. Valentine, 1928.812

artemisdreaming:

Noh costume (chôken)
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Japanese, Edo period, 18th century 
JapanDimensions105.4 x 205.8 cm (41 1/2 x 81 1/48 in.)Medium or TechniqueSilk gauze ground with silk and gilt-paper strip discontinuous supplementary patterning wefts

artemisdreaming:

Noh costume (chôken)

Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Japanese, Edo period, 18th century 

JapanDimensions105.4 x 205.8 cm (41 1/2 x 81 1/48 in.)Medium or TechniqueSilk gauze ground with silk and gilt-paper strip discontinuous supplementary patterning wefts